Tuesday, 23 June 2015

Anonymous comments + Teaser

My blog has recieved almost 600 comments by now, which is awesome. I appreciate each of them and am thankful for the vivid interest in my posts!
But one thing is that a lot of commenters here write anonymous comments. That's not a problem per se, but confuses me because I don't know with how many people I am dealing with and who I wrote something already or not, with the result that I wrote the same stuff multiple times. That's a bit impractical. Therefore I would like to ask my commenters to pick a consistant name for their comments, just for me to know who I am dealing with to maintain a useful mode of communication. When posting, there is a function "Comment as" where you have a lot of options - one of them is "name/URL" where you can type just any jibberish as "name" if you prefer not to reveal your true identity. Or you could simply write your name or "name" below or above your actual text in the comment. I prefer pseudonymous over anonymous. 
But again, I appreciate each comment that I recieve and am very happy that a number of posts created a lot of fruiteful discussion. This request is just for my orient myself easier with all responses that I recieve. Thanks, folks! 

And now a little teaser: 
My next post is going to be on the European water buffalo and buffalo in Europe. I have been planning to write on that for ages, but I never got to it. 
Domestic water buffalo in the Nationalpark Neusiedlersee-Seewinkel, Austria.

9 comments:

  1. Yay! it was me that commented on your last post if you could do a post on waterbuffalo ;-). Glad to see that you are looking into doing one! My name is Jeffrey btw. I am 28 and live in a small town in the Netherlands near Breda. Near the Uruz cattle btw ;-) I am an apprentice at Staatsbosbeheer ( Dutch State Forestry Department ). One of my big interests is breeding back and i visit your blog a couple of times a week! Great work and I'm looking forward to reading your next post. Greetings

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    1. Thanks for the kind words and your introduction to yourself!
      Cool that you live next to an Uruz breeding site, perhaps in some years you could provide us with some nice photos of the cattle there ;).
      Yep, I just started to write the article, hope to get it done before I start my apprentice work in Innsbruck this summer.

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  2. Ahhh Daniel, I am really glad that u r going to writte about the european water bufallo! Really! one of the less known species that existed in Europe, in my work (I am a guide in Bialowieza National Park in Poland) when I talk about the extint european megafaune people dont even believe this species existed here, eh eh. Good to know that I will be able to get my knowladge deeper. A sugestion for next species maybe the european Onager :) Best regards! João Ferro

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  3. Yes! the european wild ass is good one too. i have heard of some plans to reintroduce wild ass to northern Spain. (I read it in this blog : http://www.freenature.eu/free-en/p000514/news/news-archive/2012/dutch-grazers-help-rewilding-cantrabrian-mountains )
    I wonder if they have ever done DNA research on European wild ass bones? It may turn out that they are not a seperate European species, but belong to the same species as Onager/Kulan etc. Just like the Caspian tigers and Siberian tigers recently turned out so be the same animal. In that case the European wild ass isn't extinct at all, but just severely range restricted. I'm also really looking forward to the water buffalo article. Both species, I feel, are sort of "left behind" by nature reserves and rewilding organisations. They deserve a more prominent role. Just like nobody is talking about (re-)introducing asiatic lions to eastern Europe in the future. Lions were clearly present here only a few centuries back. And in turkey even untill only a few decades ago! Anyways. I am getting off topic here in my enthusiasm... :P Good luck with the article! greetings

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  4. Hello Jeffrey, considering some recent genetic studies made in Equus hydruntinus yes the European wild ass was the same species as the present Equus hemionus as we can see here: http://s1.zetaboards.com/anthroscape/topic/5219155/1/ and here: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1365-294X.2006.02922.x/abstract;jsessionid=1F5E9C91487E6AA986A72A9D51F704EB.f03t02. So genetic evidence shows that the Onager and the European wild ass are the same species!
    Best regards
    João Ferro

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    1. Hi joao! yeah that is what i thought as well. high time that they start some reintroduction/rewilding projects with these animals. i would suggest the iberian peninsula and steppe areas such as Hortobagy in Hungary. if we wait too long, the last wild ones could possibly die out.

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  5. Hi Daniel, I'm looking forward your post about the European Water Buffalo. I'm wondering what you will say about the crossing of a wild asian water buffalo bull with domestic water buffalo cows in the Danube delta. I feel uncomfortable about it as I believe that a totally wild nucleus herd should be started there since there is so few wild water buffalo in the wild; it would provide a backup herd in Europe that could raise awareness in Europe and Asia about the plight of wild water buffalo. I don't think I would be as awestruck visiting the reserve in the Danube delta to see hybrids rather than genuine wild water buffalo. I'm guessing why this is being done might relate to taming the unpredictable temperament of a wild animal and also legal problems with introducing a wild animal long gone from the area. It would be interesting if you could do an article about the European Wild Ass which as the guys above relate looks to be of the same species with the Onager, closest possibly being the Turkmenian Kulan which is in a slightly vulnerable position and from an article found online is declining in favour as a zoo animal. An post about wild Bactrian camels would be welcome too as I believe they may have extended to the lower Volga region and possibly further west in the past. Anyway best of luck and I am looking forward to whatever you post, Regards, David

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    1. Hi David! have you heard of the Pleistocene park in Russia? They plant to rewild the mammoth steppe they have there to conserve the permafrost. ther are restocking it with all animals that are still left today that also lived in that area back during the ice ages. Among them bactrian camels. There is quite some info about it on the internet. It might interest you. just google it ;-) Cheers, jeff

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  6. I tried to post as my name but it wasn't working for me; I'm David Kenny from Ireland who grow up with cattle all my life but sadly work at a desk now :(. Love your blog

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